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Thread: Why is my mac giving wrong CMYK colors?

  1. #1
    Donor sprocketty is on a distinguished road
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    Why is my mac giving wrong CMYK colors?

    Hi everyone,

    This may be a noob question, but an hour of googling didn't get me an answer.

    For a specific CMYK color (100, 0, 23, 20)
    Why is my Mac showing one color, while online convertors showing another?

    I have reason to believe my mac is showing the wrong color.

    How do I correct this? Is there something I am missing?

    Thanks.

    [URL=http://imgur.com/bco0Il3][/URL]

  2. #2
    Junior Member Mika is on a distinguished road
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    If I type in that CMYK code it shows the same more blueish color for me on my Mac. One possibility could be that the Pantone color you want is not possible to obtain in CMYK. It probably contains white and is therefore not in the CMYK spectra. :/

  3. #3
    Banned nsthtc is on a distinguished road
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    Simple, the web is displaying a standard RGB palette while Adobe programs have built in color profiles. Also, be sure you're working in the native color space for appropriate applications. CMYK for print, RGB for web. Don't trust how a color looks on screen on the internet, it'll be inaccurate for CMYK applications. Trust your numbers.

  4. #4
    Banned soapb0x is on a distinguished road
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    Web browsers don't process CMYK colors (They process RGB) which is probably why the online converter looks off. From my experience, Macs with retina displays will give you 90% accurate colors when compared to prints.

    Lastly, I am not quite sure what you are trying to do because that color selection screen does not look like photoshop or illustrator :\

  5. #5
    Donor sprocketty is on a distinguished road
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    Thanks for the replies everyone.

    Here is the Illustrator color picker:

    [URL=http://imgur.com/Snd10sW][/URL]


    So, would it be right to say that the mac / adobe color picker is the one giving the TRUE CMYK color? And that the online generators are wrong?

    Sorry I am confused, it is just that when trying to search for this color online, I keep getting the lighter, greener shade instead, for example, trying this online convertor:

    http://www.colorhexa.com/00cc9d
    http://web.forret.com/tools/color.asp?C=100&M=0%2C000&Y=23&K=20

  6. #6
    Banned nsthtc is on a distinguished road
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    The Adobe color picker yes, is probably giving you the most accurate representation. Now, everyone's monitor is different, but it's pretty close.

  7. #7
    Donor sprocketty is on a distinguished road
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    To give a bit more background to my question, I have a design/print job where the customer gave me a CMYK value (100 0 23 20), and also believes (I think) that the color he wants is that which the online generators are showing him.

    This is confusing for me.

  8. #8
    Banned nsthtc is on a distinguished road
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    Quote Originally Posted by sprocketty View Post
    To give a bit more background to my question, I have a design/print job where the customer gave me a CMYK value (100 0 23 20), and also believes (I think) that the color he wants is that which the online generators are showing him.

    This is confusing for me.
    I see the problem here. If the client wants the color seen on the online converter, I suggest you, forget those numbers, screen grab the color online, place it in your document and play with your CMYK sliders until you get something close. Often times RGB colors are not achievable in CMYK. It also may lose it's vibrance when in CMYK. I think you might be okay on this one, but for future reference, try not to refer to these crack online color converters. Trust what you see in Adobe.

    Pantones are a whole other story!

  9. #9
    Donor sprocketty is on a distinguished road
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    Thanks so much for the replies everyone!

    I will trust adobe and double check exactly what the client prefers.

  10. #10
    Banned nsthtc is on a distinguished road
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    Quote Originally Posted by sprocketty View Post
    Thanks so much for the replies everyone!

    I will trust adobe and double check exactly what the client prefers.
    Out of curiosity I gave it a go myself… 60, 0, 45, 0 is probably the closest you're going to get. Note that it is indeed duller.

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  12. #11
    Banned mossydenis is on a distinguished road
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    Quote Originally Posted by sprocketty View Post
    Thanks so much for the replies everyone!

    I will trust adobe and double check exactly what the client prefers.
    Your client will be looking at the colour on a different screen. You will NEVER get an accurate representation of what he/she is looking at (and vice versa).

    Be careful - it might come back to haunt you later. 'Pantone' are in business to help everyone stay on the same page. You can buy 'Pantone chips' and send some to the client. The client can then choose one and send you on the exact numbers (even the C.M.Y.K conversion).
    Last edited by mossydenis; 03-06-2014 at 10:53 PM.

  13. #12
    Junior Member gazraven is on a distinguished road
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    Proof Proof Proof

    All colour variations can be worked out by proofing with a hard copy until the client is satisfied with the colour.

    Everything said here about RGB/CMYK differences is true and then some! PDF proofs are a good option if hard copies are not able to be printed accurately. PDFs will include profiles to display colours as accurately as it can but, the proof of the pudding is in the eating and you won't see the result of your work until the final job is printed.

    You should always bear in mind how the final job is to be printed as everything else is just (educated) guesswork.

    I get problems like this all the time when clients bring me 'already designed' artwork that they created in Microsoft Publisher and then wonder why the bright oranges and vibrant blues don't look the same when printed.

  14. #13
    Banned AronTMM is on a distinguished road
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    EVERY designer who designs for print absolutely NEEDS to have the coated and uncoated CMYK (Process) books - NOT THE BRIDGE!!!!

    These, used in combination with a regular Pantone Solid (coated & uncoated) book will allow you to match pantone to CMYK most accurately.

    I seldom use my Pantone Solid book however - given most print these days is done CMYK, i go straight for the pantone CMYK (process) coated book and pick my colours from there - its far easier to match a pantone colour to a CMYK colour than it is to go the other way around due to pantone solids having a wider gamut than CMYK.

    If the above doesn't make sense to you - do a google search for Pantone vs. CMYK gamut =)

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  16. #14
    Junior Member Vitaly Groo is on a distinguished road
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    EVERY designer who designs for print absolutely NEEDS to have the coated and uncoated CMYK (Process) books - NOT THE BRIDGE!!!!

    These, used in combination with a regular Pantone Solid (coated & uncoated) book will allow you to match pantone to CMYK most accurately.

    I agree completely! No pontoon books exact color no. On the screen from Google qualitatively not see, shades

  17. #15
    Junior Member Vitaly Groo is on a distinguished road
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    I totally agree. Especially monitor emits light. and paper and paint reflects the spectrum of colors. And the colors are different methods of getting physically. Spot color prevented by adding various particles. resulting homogeneous juicy not repeatable color on paper.

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