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Thread: HELP: First time freelancing at a "difficult" Agency/Studio

  1. #1
    Banned villadean is on a distinguished road
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    HELP: First time freelancing at a Agency/Studio

    Hey everyone, first time freelancer here i'm looking for some help/mentoring if possible
    to help me understand the procedures of a freelance designer.

    Here's a little back story:
    I graduated just last year, and secured myself a number different paid internships where i gained lots of hands-on experience.

    I've now been offered a 3-month freelancing junior designer position at a company with a annum salary of £16,000.

    Because I'm a freelancer, How should i invoice them? What about Tax n stuff? (Complete Amateur)

    The previous studio/agencies I've worked at had there own HR departments, should invoicing wasn't required of me.
    Last edited by villadean; 05-27-2014 at 02:29 AM.

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    Banned Q840av is on a distinguished road
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    More details needed

    That will depend on your local laws, taxes varies per country (even within a country i.e. USA).

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    Banned doomallcaps is on a distinguished road
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    Hi – I think it's always good to talk to a studio manager or similar in terms of getting paid. It can vary from agency to agency on payment, however most agencies will pay freelancers monthly (along with there full time staff). So best to invoice as you go.. I'd suggest weekly (depending on if a longer time period has been agreed). I'd also recommend not being afraid to follow up if your invoice hasn't been paid! From the sounds of it however as your straight from university near enough its more than likely that the agency employing you will cut you some slack for not knowing. Just my 2 cents.

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    Banned doomallcaps is on a distinguished road
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    There is also a ton online..

    http://business.tutsplus.com/articles/a-comprehensive-guide-to-starting-your-freelance-career--fsw-14

  5. #5
    Normal Member lesmiguel is on a distinguished road
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    There's really no better advice than this: be straightforward. Set a meeting with your 'employer' and talk about billing. Clients hate freelancers who beat around the bush for pricing because it shows unprofessionalism.

  6. #6
    Member armourer is a glorious beacon of light armourer is a glorious beacon of light armourer is a glorious beacon of light armourer is a glorious beacon of light armourer is a glorious beacon of light armourer is a glorious beacon of light
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    Advice

    1. Make sure you both know everything that is expected of each other: hours, rates of pay and payment terms especially, etc - make sure you get some form of official document itemising these things i.e. a purchase order.

    2. Invoice them either every 2 weeks or at end of month (base the date you invoice them around their payment runs - some companies pay out suppliers every 2 weeks, some at end of month).
    Make sure that they do not under any circumstances try to make you accept payment terms over 30 days - this is a recipe for disaster. Put at the bottom of the invoice you send them: I understand and will exercise my statutory right to interest and compensation for debt recovery costs under the late payment legislation if I am not paid according to agreed credit terms. See www.http://payontime.co.uk

    3. Re the tax if you intend on being a full time freelancer (I've been freelancing for the past 14 years and its had its ups and downs) get a good local accountant (c£300-400 per year to do your books and submit accounts to HMRC). If not go through the HMRC self-assessment section of their website.

    4. Keep receipts of any expenses you have whilst freelancing (car, fuel, computer, train etc) - your accountant can claim them back against your tax. Most importantly put around 30% (benchmark figure) of what you earn aside for the taxman.

    V important piece of advice: don't let them mess you around on being paid - this is your only source of income, you can't work at two places at the same time.

    Good luck

    Any advice I can give send me private message.

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