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Thread: TTF "and" OTF?

  1. #16
    Senior Member Speeker has much to be proud of Speeker has much to be proud of Speeker has much to be proud of Speeker has much to be proud of Speeker has much to be proud of Speeker has much to be proud of Speeker has much to be proud of Speeker has much to be proud of Speeker has much to be proud of
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    While we're at it, I'm finding that a good number of older, stagnant TT fonts are now able to be found as OTF, but as I suspect that they haven't been re-created by their original designer/foundry (and that they possess no added features or glyphs), I suspect that they were made into an OTF by somebody else (Joe Public). So how is that done?

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  3. #17
    Banned bokusen is on a distinguished road
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    Quote Originally Posted by Speeker View Post
    I think you mean OTF, correct?
    Yeah. I guess I missed a typo. Thanks for catching it! I edited the post.

    Quote Originally Posted by Speeker View Post
    While we're at it, I'm finding that a good number of older, stagnant TT fonts are now able to be found as OTF, but as I suspect that they haven't been re-created by their original designer/foundry (and that they possess no added features or glyphs), I suspect that they were made into an OTF by somebody else (Joe Public). So how is that done?
    Through a program like FontLab. Or just Google something like "TTF to OTF" and you'll find online converter sites. I don't know if they do as good of a job at it, but they're probably decent.

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  5. #18
    Senior Member Speeker has much to be proud of Speeker has much to be proud of Speeker has much to be proud of Speeker has much to be proud of Speeker has much to be proud of Speeker has much to be proud of Speeker has much to be proud of Speeker has much to be proud of Speeker has much to be proud of
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    Quote Originally Posted by bokusen View Post
    Through a program like FontLab. Or just Google something like "TTF to OTF" and you'll find online converter sites. I don't know if they do as good of a job at it, but they're probably decent.
    Thanks. If the (older) font has no alternate characters/glyphs, then why would anyone bother to convert it to an OTF? Any advantages?

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  7. #19
    Junior Member designburton is on a distinguished road
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    yes I would use otf

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  9. #20
    Banned maffs is on a distinguished road
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    From how i understand it, otf is a newer improved version of ttf.

    otf files contain far more character based info like glyphs, ligatures and alternate language settings. Having said that if you don't have to use multiple languages in your design work then you may not ever need any of that extra info but i would opt for otf over ttf or indeed post script anytime!
    Last edited by maffs; 11-21-2013 at 07:22 AM.

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  11. #21
    Member ShotShot is a name known to all ShotShot is a name known to all ShotShot is a name known to all ShotShot is a name known to all ShotShot is a name known to all ShotShot is a name known to all
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    Quote Originally Posted by Speeker View Post
    When you have a font in both TTF and OTF, do you toss the TTF in favour of the OTF?
    It depends on the quality of outlines, intended use, features at hand...

    These are simply file extensions, providing no clues as to the quality and features of a font. People who toss files with a .ttf extension based on whatever weird prejudice they have, should read a bit about the topic and understand what it really implies.
    For more info about OpenType, google & wikipedia are your friends.

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  13. #22
    Senior Member Speeker has much to be proud of Speeker has much to be proud of Speeker has much to be proud of Speeker has much to be proud of Speeker has much to be proud of Speeker has much to be proud of Speeker has much to be proud of Speeker has much to be proud of Speeker has much to be proud of
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    Quote Originally Posted by ShotShot View Post
    It depends on the quality of outlines, intended use, features at hand...
    True enough. But I guess a person can't really know without installing both and closely inspecting the quality.

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  15. #23
    Banned joss.fritz is on a distinguished road
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    PLease allow me two add my two pence to this (and please correct if do not remember correctly). Nowadays .ttf and .otf are only different flavours of opentype. The former is simply based on quadratic bezier lines, thus the file is slightly larger because the quadratic function needs more data to «describe» the outline. Therefore the .otf files that are based on quadratic functions save some space.

    But in the end I never saw a visible difference when the printed prdoucts arrives. I would therefore be hesitant to advise to delete the one or the other version. Also: I do not really see the need. All fonts I will ever need in my whole life will probably need the same amount of diskspace that is needed to store one or two HD movies!

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  17. #24
    Senior Member Speeker has much to be proud of Speeker has much to be proud of Speeker has much to be proud of Speeker has much to be proud of Speeker has much to be proud of Speeker has much to be proud of Speeker has much to be proud of Speeker has much to be proud of Speeker has much to be proud of
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    I have another question related to all this that's been perplexing me for some time:

    I have a fairly robust 6-core Win7 64-bit computer, yet when I attempt to open (view) some TT fonts which are large, they take a long time to open. I just had one (2940 KB) take forever; I finally had to cancel out.

    Why are they so demanding?

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  19. #25
    Junior Member jrclose is on a distinguished road
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    OTF. when available, always.

  20. Your ad here

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  22. #26
    Banned design fangirl is on a distinguished road
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    I always keep the OTF versions and toss the TTFs when I get both. Ever since I learned how to properly use type and glyphs I've been fascinated with the possibilities of using Opentype fonts. I replace any TTF versions with OTFs when I can and periodically go through my library to make sure I don't have duplicates.

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  24. #27
    Member ShotShot is a name known to all ShotShot is a name known to all ShotShot is a name known to all ShotShot is a name known to all ShotShot is a name known to all ShotShot is a name known to all
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    Quote Originally Posted by joss.fritz View Post
    PLease allow me two add my two pence to this (and please correct if do not remember correctly). Nowadays .ttf and .otf are only different flavours of opentype. The former is simply based on quadratic bezier lines, thus the file is slightly larger because the quadratic function needs more data to «describe» the outline. Therefore the .otf files that are based on quadratic functions save some space.

    But in the end I never saw a visible difference when the printed prdoucts arrives. I would therefore be hesitant to advise to delete the one or the other version. Also: I do not really see the need. All fonts I will ever need in my whole life will probably need the same amount of diskspace that is needed to store one or two HD movies!
    Nice addition.
    In print, there shouldn't be any visible difference, the difference between quadratic and bezier description being negligible. However TrueType outlines routinely offer more efficient hinting (especially if rendered under Windows, for historical reasons) - which makes them actually superior to OT-CFF fonts for on-screen use (and as noted, they'll look the same when used in print). Why trash the TrueType one then? Can't figure any sensible reason.

    Moreover, a few foundries offer fonts under different formats with different features - the most famous one being Linotype/Monotype/ITC with its 'com' variants. For instance compare Palatino Nova 'Pro' (.otf) and Palatino Nova 'Com' (.ttf): both are OpenType, but the Pro (OT-CFF, .otf) one looks terribad on screen, the latter one (Com, OT-TTF, .ttf) looks perfect while offering a more extensive language coverage. One has to be shortsighted, ill-informed, or dumb to blindly trash the latter one...

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  26. #28
    Banned tmedeiros is on a distinguished road
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    If you just want a font that prints well and is easy to read on the screen, then consider using a TrueType font. If you need a large character set for language coverage and fine typography, then you might want to use an OpenType font. If you need to print professional quality print publications, such as glossy magazines, or you need to do commercial printing, PostScript is a good choice.

    http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows-vista/whats-the-difference-between-truetype-postscript-and-opentype-fonts

    I did not know these differences.

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  28. #29
    Member ShotShot is a name known to all ShotShot is a name known to all ShotShot is a name known to all ShotShot is a name known to all ShotShot is a name known to all ShotShot is a name known to all
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    Fortunately... since MS's answer makes next to no sense.

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  30. #30
    Junior Member limakus is on a distinguished road
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    TTF is better

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