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Thread: Pro vs Com

  1. #1
    Banned sabotage420 is just really nice sabotage420 is just really nice sabotage420 is just really nice sabotage420 is just really nice
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    Pro vs Com

    Is there really any difference between a PRO or COM versions of font families?

    I know Pro vs Std just means it covers more then just Latin characters (Western, Central-European, Eastern-European, Baltic etc) with multi Greek, Cyrillic etc covered.

    I usually just go for Pro cause well it ensures its not a demo or trial (has number, symbols chars and latin) but I have a few that are Com families. Wondering if there is really any difference and if I should be searching for other version on a few families.

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    Member Fontjunkie will become famous soon enough Fontjunkie will become famous soon enough
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    OpenType Pro fonts contain characters for at least the following 33 languages being based on the Latin alphabet:

    Afrikaans, Basque, Breton, Catalan, Croatian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, English, Estonian, Finnish, French, Gaelic (Irish, Scots), German, Hungarian, Icelandic, Indonesian, Irish, Italian, Latvian, Lithuanian, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Saami (Southern), Serbian, Slovak, Slovenian, Spanish, Swahili, Swedish, Turkish.

    Moreover, a lot of OpenType Pro fonts contain characters for more languages being based on the Latin alphabet. Some OpenType Pro fonts contain additional typographical character variants.



    OpenType Com fonts have been optimized for international communication and for use with Microsoft Office applications. For these fonts an extended character set, the Linotype Extended European Character set (LEEC), has been defined.
    With a minimum of 387 characters, this standard guarantees that 56 languages can be supported by every OpenType Com font:

    Afrikaans, Albanian, Basque, Bosnian, Breton, Catalan, Cornish, Croatian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, English, Estonian, Faroese, Finnish, French, Frisian, Friulian, Gaelic (Irish, Scots), Gagauz (Latin), Galician, German, Hungarian, Icelandic, Indonesian, Irish, Italian, Karelian, Ladin, Latvian, Lithuanian, Maltese, Moldavian (Latin), Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese, Rhaeto-Romanic, Romanian, Saami (Southern), Serbian, Slovak, Slovenian, Sorbian, Spanish, Swahili, Swedish, Turkish, Turkmen (Latin).

    These fonts may also include characters for further languages and typeface specific typographical character variants.


    --------------------other ----------------------------------

    OpenType Std category contain an extended Latin character
    This character set supports the following 21 languages:

    Afrikaans, Basque, Breton, Catalan, Danish, Dutch, English, Finnish, French, Gaelic (Irish, Scots), German, Icelandic, Indonesian, Irish, Italian, Norwegian, Portuguese, Saami (Southern), Spanish, Swahili, Swedish.

    In individual cases, further non-Latin lan-guages and typographical character variants may be included in these fonts. In some cases headline or fun fonts may not support all the languages listed above.



    W1G (WGL4) OpenType fonts have an extended character set for international communication. W1G not only supports many languages based on the Latin alphabet but also several languages based on the Cyrillic alphabet. In addition, W1G (WGL4) fonts sup-port monotonic Greek.
    In the following character set table, characters which are W1G only, are highlighted bold, characters, which are WGL4 only, are highlighted gray.

    With more than 600 characters, this standard guarantees that at least 89 languages can be supported by every W1G font:

    Latin: Afrikaans, Albanian, Alsatian, Arumanian, Asturian, Basque, Bosnian, Breton, Catalan, Cebuano, Chichewa, Cornish, Corsican, Croatian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, English, Esperanto, Estonian, Faroese, Filipino, Finnish, French, Frisian, Friulian, Gaelic, Gagauz (Latin), Galician, German, Greenlandic, Hungarian, Icelandic, Indonesian, Irish, Italian, Karelian, Ladin, Latin (Lingua Latina), Latvian, Lithuanian, Luba, Maltese, Moldavian (Latin), Norwegian, Occitan, Polish, Portuguese, Rheto-Romance, Romanian, Sámi (Lule), Sámi (Northern), Sámi (Southern), Serbian, Slovak, Slovenian, Sorbian, Spanish, Swahili, Swedish, Turkish, Turkmen (Latin), Vepsian, Welsh, Wolof, Zulu.
    Cyrillic: Agul, Avar, Balkar, Belarusian, Bulgarian, Chechen, Erzya, Gagauz, Ingush, Karachay, Khvarshi, Komi, Komi-Permyak, Lezgian, Macedonian, Moldavian, Nenets Tundra, Ossetian, Russian, Rutul, Serbian, Ukrainian.
    Greek.
    These fonts may also include further languages and typeface specific typographical character variants.



    W2G OpenType fonts have an extended character set for international communication. W2G fonts support many languages based on the Latin and the Cyrillic alphabet. In addition, W2G fonts support monotonic Greek and Hebrew.
    The following character set table shows all characters of a W2G font.

    With more than 890 characters, this standard guarantees that at least 93 languages can be supported by every W2G font:

    Latin: Afrikaans, Albanian, Alsatian, Arumanian, Asturian, Azerbaijanian, Basque, Bosnian, Breton, Catalan, Cebuano, Chichewa, Cornish, Corsican, Croatian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, English, Esperanto, Estonian, Faroese, Filipino, Finnish, French, Frisian, Friulian, Gaelic, Gagauz (Latin), Galician, German, Greenlandic, Hungarian, Icelandic, Indonesian, Irish, Italian, Karelian, Kazakh, Ladin, Latin (Lingua Latina), Latvian, Lithuanian, Luba, Maltese, Moldavian (Latin), Norwegian, Occitan, Polish, Portuguese, Rheto-Romance, Romanian, Sámi (Lule), Sámi (Northern), Sámi (Southern), Serbian, Slovak, Slovenian, Sorbian, Spanish, Swahili, Swedish, Turk-ish, Turkmen (Latin), Vepsian, Vietnamese, Welsh, Wolof, Zulu.
    Cyrillic: Agul, Aserbaijan, Avar, Balkar, Belarusian, Bulgarian, Chechen, Erzya, Gagauz, Ingush, Karachay, Kazakh, Khvarshi, Komi, Komi-Permyak, Lezgian, Macedonian, Moldavian, Nenets Tundra, Ossetian, Russian, Rutul, Serbian, Ukrainian.
    Greek.
    Hebrew.
    These fonts may also include further languages and typeface specific typographical character variants.


    Source:Linotype

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    Junior Member isacrosta will become famous soon enough
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    Great article... I didn't have a clue about most of this things!

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    Member ShotShot is a name known to all ShotShot is a name known to all ShotShot is a name known to all ShotShot is a name known to all ShotShot is a name known to all ShotShot is a name known to all
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    Please keep in mind that these "Pro", "Std", "Com", "WGL", "Plus", "Pro+", "W1G" or "W2G" terms are all specific to various foundries, and have no unified meaning.

    What FontFont calls 'Pro' fonts differs from what Berthold calls 'Pro' fonts differs from what Adobe calls 'Pro' fonts differs from what ... etc. etc. These names are mostly for marketing purposes, with no definitive bearing or significance regarding the quality, glyph coverage or feature completeness of fonts.

    Even within a foundry, the same term can have widely varying meanings (for instance, at Linotype some "Com" fonts support more languages than their Pro counterparts - which makes them roughly equal to W1G in terms of number of glyphs, but with better outlines thanks to their TrueType nature). At the very same foundry, the outlines of some 'Pro' fonts are of a much worse quality than their Std companions. Talk of a mess...

    As for 'Premium' yoghurt or 'Superior' toothpaste, one can't take the commercial mumbo-jumbo at face value...

    edit: btw, strictly speaking, WGL(4/+, a Microsoft-originating standard about minimum requirements as to glyph ranges) is different from W1G (a Linotype-only commercial term, which does not clearly define its requirements).

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    Member Fontjunkie will become famous soon enough Fontjunkie will become famous soon enough
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    Mostly for all foundries:

    Std Font <= 256 Glyphs

    Pro Font > 256 Glyphs

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  11. #6
    Member albarba12 is just really nice albarba12 is just really nice albarba12 is just really nice albarba12 is just really nice albarba12 is just really nice
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    Com fonts (according to most fonts I saw) is optimized for displays, and you can work with them on old versions of Windows, Linux light display managers or old Mac systems with none or a few errors, where anti-aliasing and ClearType isn't available.

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