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Thread: Divina Proportione (Intellecta Design)

  1. #1
    Senior Member zelenizub has a brilliant future zelenizub has a brilliant future zelenizub has a brilliant future zelenizub has a brilliant future zelenizub has a brilliant future zelenizub has a brilliant future zelenizub has a brilliant future zelenizub has a brilliant future zelenizub has a brilliant future zelenizub has a brilliant future zelenizub has a brilliant future
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    Divina Proportione (Intellecta Design)





    About this font family

    Designers: Albrecht Dürer, Paulo W
    Design date: 2009
    Publisher: Intellecta Design
    MyFonts debut: Feb 16, 2009

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    With a small correction

    Designers: Leonardo da Vinci, Luca Paciolo (not which is indicated here Albrecht Dürer)



    De Divina Proportione ( http://issuu.com/s.c.williams-library/docs/de_divina_proportione
    ) by Luca Paciolo. The wooduts are taken from illustrations by Leonardo da Vinci.



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    In 1498 Leonardo da Vinci was working as a painter and engineer for the Duke of Milan. At the same time, he was taking math lessons from his friend and roommate Luca Pacioli, who was writing De Divina Proportione, a book about geometry and proportions in math and arts.

    Pacioli asked Leonardo da Vinci to illustrate parts of the book, and that’s when the magic happened. Da Vinci produced what are considered to be the first accurate representations of solids in 3D, which are not only geometrically correct, but also absolutely stunning:



    Leonardo da Vinci, Illustration for De Divina Proportione, 1498-99 (published 1509)

    Pacioli’s De Divina Proportione (1509) became a highly influential book for architects and artists, and it remains one of the most significant works in the long history of the relationship between math and art, a relationship that has produced some of the most beautiful architecture, painting, and music in the west.


    http://thewestologist.com/tag/da-vinci/


  2. #2
    Member wordnerd has much to be proud of wordnerd has much to be proud of wordnerd has much to be proud of wordnerd has much to be proud of wordnerd has much to be proud of wordnerd has much to be proud of wordnerd has much to be proud of wordnerd has much to be proud of
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    Nicely done presentation—very educational!

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    Junior Member yossibelkin is on a distinguished road
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    Agreed! Awesome presentation love seeing all of that.

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    Senior Member zelenizub has a brilliant future zelenizub has a brilliant future zelenizub has a brilliant future zelenizub has a brilliant future zelenizub has a brilliant future zelenizub has a brilliant future zelenizub has a brilliant future zelenizub has a brilliant future zelenizub has a brilliant future zelenizub has a brilliant future zelenizub has a brilliant future
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    Thanks people

    The problem (in my opinion) is probably caused by the controversial portrait of Luca Pacioli, hence the reference to Albrecht Dürer.



    Luca Pacioli (1445–1517) is the central figure in this painting exhibited in the Museo e Gallerie di Capodimonte in Napoli (Italy). The painter is unknown, although some people are convinced the painter is Jacopo de' Barbari (1440–1515). It shows Pacioli standing behind a table and wearing the habit of a member of the Franciscan order. He draws a construction on a board, the edge of which bears the name Euclides. His left hand rests upon a page of an open book. This book may be his Summa de Arithmetica, Geometria, Proportioni et Proportionalità or a copy of Euclid. Upon the table rest the instruments of a mathematician: a sponge, a protractor, a pen, a case, a piece of chalk, and compasses. In the right corner of the table there is a dodecahedron resting upon a book bearing Pacioli's initials. An rhombicuboctahedron (a convex solid consisting of 18 squares and 8 triangles) suspends at the left of the painting. The identity of the young man at the right is uncertain, but one commentator recognizes the "eternal student" instructed by Pacioli. Some authors have also mentioned the possibility that the student is Dürer.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Pacioli.jpg
    Which is closer to typography because it published four books of measurement that describes the construction of the Latin alphabet, so-called Durer's Alphabet. All this somehow continues with...





    DaVinci Script Pro (Parachute Fonts)
    Latin and Cyrillic





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    Last edited by morpheo1967; 12-27-2015 at 10:45 AM.

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