+ Reply to Thread
Page 4 of 8 FirstFirst ... 2 3 4 5 6 ... LastLast
Results 46 to 60 of 117

Thread: inkjet ctp

  1. #46
    Donor CrossyPrinter is on a distinguished road
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    20
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    Its still a genius concept and as stated for the small shop for proofing and small plates they look promising. Early days for ctp inkjet but chemical free ctp units will look similar soon?

  2. #47
    Junior Member JoeColor is on a distinguished road
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    32
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 7 Times in 6 Posts
    The Epson 7900CTP device is an Epson 7900 (24") printer with a special version of EFI's Colorproof eXpress software which includes curves especially made for printing plates. The same ink you would buy for a traditional Epson 7900/9900 printer are used in the 7900CTP device. The ink Epson uses for printing onto plates is Cyan. So in general you would be going through more Cyan than any other ink. Other than that, it is a true Epson 7900 printer. The eXpress software can be set up with a Plate Workflow and a Proof Workflow. The only thing you can't put on this printer is the on-board Spectro. After a plate is printed you run it through a "baker" to set the ink. These plates, with the right fountain solution on press, should last between 10,000-15,000 impressions.

  3. #48
    Junior Member splashrip is on a distinguished road
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    21
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    i searched for information about inkjet CTP and found RTI-Rips.

    rti-rips also have solutions for Inkjet CTP with many inkjet Printers using alu plates and heating them.

  4. #49
    Junior Member dhtdesign is on a distinguished road
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    1
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Hi someone is using the Epson Stylus 1390 Computer to Plate System?
    Could say that such works ICC?
    Thanks

  5. #50
    Banned xuki is on a distinguished road
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    4
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Kodak

    I'm using the Kodak system prinergy the evo and have passed a

  6. #51
    Junior Member bitart is on a distinguished road
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    4
    Thanks
    13
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by JoeColor View Post
    The 7900CTP by Epson is a great chemical-free device for a small shop. The resolution and registration is great for 2-color work. I wouldn't recommend this printer if the majority of work going through it is 4-color, it's just not meant for that. The good side of this printer is that it is a true 7900 so not only do you have a plate maker, but also a great way to proof.
    I am also interested in this unit.
    If you own a Epson 7900CTP, you can put the scan work? Or share where to get information.

  7. #52
    PRC Member johnlongthomas is on a distinguished road
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    160
    Thanks
    38
    Thanked 31 Times in 22 Posts

    Epson 9900 conventional ps plate platemaker experiment

    Where I come from buying special plates from epson or glunz and jensen or who ever is not a practical consideration, so as an experiment over the next couple of months I am thinking of doing as flollows:

    1 Buying a usb digital microscope and using it in conjuction with apfil coverage calculator to do accurate linearization and press gain/loss calculation

    2 Harlequin cross modulated 1 bit screening to epson driver

    3 Use my laser cutter to make an accurate (maybe better than oem) adjustable plate guide to fit to the epson.

    4 Use refillable, resettable 700ml cartriges from China along with their pigment ink which goes for arond $25 per litre

    5 Print onto conventional uv sensitive positive plate. A mixture of black and yellow should give sufficient density to act as a good mask without being so much that the image starts to feather (wick). The conventional coating actually looks like quite a nice suface to jet onto with aqueous pigment. There's a bit of tooth there. If it won't dry quickly I will cut back or maybe introduce some heat

    6 expose without vaccum, develop and gum.

    My thinking here is that I can buy a 4 up conventional plate for $2.50. This plate will do more than 50 000 impressions even with a rough minder and respond well to press chemistry printers are already comfortable with. This process cuts out the need for any film which will soon cost more per square meter than conventional plate. I calculate that I should be able to sell a well profitable plate at around the cost for the fellows using violet or thermal. With the epson 9900 I will be able to do 8up and larger

    My concerns are about registration foremost and then about putting enough ink onto the plate to be a good mask (density) without messing up accurate dot reproduction.

    I would greatly appreciate any constructive criticism of this idea along with advice form others who may have been down this road.

    For those who might wonder why I would attempt such a cheapskate manouver I answer as follows - we are a conventional pre-press company that has been making films for more than 20 years, first on a light table, darkroom system, then more lately with ultre and ecrm imagesetters. When platesetting came up, we decided to move onto digital print, which has been ok, figuring that all the printers would buy their own ctp equipment. This hasn't been the case and we still do a lot of film. The recent increase in the price of film has made me think again, but I don't want to spend a ton of money on a full on ctp system.

  8. #53
    PRC Member congproprint will become famous soon enough congproprint's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    252
    Thanks
    86
    Thanked 85 Times in 47 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by johnlongthomas View Post
    Where I come from buying special plates from epson or glunz and jensen or who ever is not a practical consideration, so as an experiment over the next couple of months I am thinking of doing as flollows:

    1 Buying a usb digital microscope and using it in conjuction with apfil coverage calculator to do accurate linearization and press gain/loss calculation

    2 Harlequin cross modulated 1 bit screening to epson driver

    3 Use my laser cutter to make an accurate (maybe better than oem) adjustable plate guide to fit to the epson.

    4 Use refillable, resettable 700ml cartriges from China along with their pigment ink which goes for arond $25 per litre

    5 Print onto conventional uv sensitive positive plate. A mixture of black and yellow should give sufficient density to act as a good mask without being so much that the image starts to feather (wick). The conventional coating actually looks like quite a nice suface to jet onto with aqueous pigment. There's a bit of tooth there. If it won't dry quickly I will cut back or maybe introduce some heat

    6 expose without vaccum, develop and gum.

    My thinking here is that I can buy a 4 up conventional plate for $2.50. This plate will do more than 50 000 impressions even with a rough minder and respond well to press chemistry printers are already comfortable with. This process cuts out the need for any film which will soon cost more per square meter than conventional plate. I calculate that I should be able to sell a well profitable plate at around the cost for the fellows using violet or thermal. With the epson 9900 I will be able to do 8up and larger

    My concerns are about registration foremost and then about putting enough ink onto the plate to be a good mask (density) without messing up accurate dot reproduction.

    I would greatly appreciate any constructive criticism of this idea along with advice form others who may have been down this road.

    For those who might wonder why I would attempt such a cheapskate manouver I answer as follows - we are a conventional pre-press company that has been making films for more than 20 years, first on a light table, darkroom system, then more lately with ultre and ecrm imagesetters. When platesetting came up, we decided to move onto digital print, which has been ok, figuring that all the printers would buy their own ctp equipment. This hasn't been the case and we still do a lot of film. The recent increase in the price of film has made me think again, but I don't want to spend a ton of money on a full on ctp system.
    is it inkjet CTP?

  9. #54
    PRC Member congproprint will become famous soon enough congproprint's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    252
    Thanks
    86
    Thanked 85 Times in 47 Posts
    i have seen in PMA, i think it is not good. too slow

  10. #55
    ndoring10
    Guest

    Only for small printshops

    I have seen iCTP in production... If we compare iCTP and regular thermal CTP, iCTP looks like a toy... its only for small printshops which don't use 200 lpi, who have time for slow output and which don't need professional machine...
    In otherwise this is waste of money...
    Clogging is another story... Head need to be cleaned every day... especially in summer period, clogging is more often and then you need power cleaning which use ink heavy...
    Head is expensive... when you go on holiday you can use cleaning cartridges, but then you must empty all ink... thats another cost...
    What happens when head don't print correctly and you don't see it on halftone... you will see when plate is in print run... but then is too late...
    My opinion is: this "CTP" is only for those with good nerves, lot of time and small runs...

  11. Your ad here

  12. #56
    Junior Member wamahiu is on a distinguished road
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    5
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    8 years ago, inkjet ctp was unthinkable. It is currently achieving 175 lpi and good print quality. Those who have used the Epson system say the only issue is plates require cleaning prior to print. In another few years we look forward to FM screening. Equipment cost is cheap compared to laser ctp.

    Consumables ie. blank plates and ink cost less than half that of laser. This is especially important in this age of printing businesses facing hard times.

    Service is another issue. Imagine having to fly out a tech rep to Africa every time the machine acts up.

    If your average run length is in the region of 20k impressions, I suggest you seriously consider going for a demo. You could keep your old system for the odd job above 20k impressions.

  13. #57
    Junior Member wamahiu is on a distinguished road
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    5
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts

    Innovative!

    I think the only problem you might face will be maintaining round dot shape on on the plate till the ink dries sufficiently for exposure. A certain popular plate manufacturer from India overcame this problem by coating a standard positive plate with a thin plastic layer suitable for inkjet printing. This layer is then peeled off after exposing the plate and prior to processing it. The result is a cheap long run plate imaged on a cheap printer without the need for expensive imagesetting film. The full color printed work is very pleasing and only a trained printer would tell it apart from a 200lpi CTP plate. Last time I checked, most of my printed material was being read by people who did not even know the images are an optical illusion made up of dots...

  14. #58
    ndoring10
    Guest

    Only for small runs

    If you mean serious business buy real CTP... Epson, G&J are toys... if You need CTP only for small runs and you can't afford real CTP thats machine for you... in otherwise think twice... price for this machines are small, but daily maintenance and clogging are big minus for this technology... also only for small print runs... up to 175 lpi... slow... and so on and on...

  15. #59
    PRC Member congproprint will become famous soon enough congproprint's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    252
    Thanks
    86
    Thanked 85 Times in 47 Posts
    I have seen a iCTP, I don't remember the name exactly, from glunzensen and look like the Epson stylus pro (we have 2 epson 9400). I think it isn't good solution for print. Because:
    1. Too slow output in hight resolution.
    2. Only for short run length.
    3. The image area isn't stable.
    But: the iCTP machine is cheaper than CTP machine, the plate don't need chemistry to deverlop.

  16. The Following User Says Thank You to congproprint For This Useful Post:

  17. #60
    Donor junkai21 is on a distinguished road
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    15
    Thanks
    6
    Thanked 4 Times in 3 Posts
    Inkjet CTP Machines are too slow to use! It takes an average 30-50mins for a a1 sized plate.

    oh gawd that's ~1hour a plate, 4 hours for 4C!!!

+ Reply to Thread
Page 4 of 8 FirstFirst ... 2 3 4 5 6 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Inkjet DYE printing on metal
    By Marte in forum General Chat
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 12-31-2012, 07:30 AM
  2. ICC for Desktop Inkjet Printers
    By mtb_ro in forum Color Proofing Management
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 01-14-2012, 04:48 PM
  3. Matlab controls inkjet printer
    By yidixiang in forum Imposition & RiP
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-30-2011, 10:02 PM
  4. 301 Inkjet
    By mae4444 in forum Books & Tutorials
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-16-2011, 05:40 PM

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts