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Thread: Inkjet resolution question

  1. #16
    Junior Member Joeric is on a distinguished road
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    Actually, For a image 300dpi should be corrected to 300 ppi, pixel per inch.
    For CTP 2400 dpi should be understood is 2400dpi, dot per inch. the laser dot.
    So, that is different, obviously.

  2. #17
    Donor bcolour is on a distinguished road
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    Inkjet printer resolution is not exactly a simple statement

    When comparing inkjet printers by dpi resolution, the problem is that this is not really an accurate representation of inkjet printing technology.
    If you were to zoom into the ink drops you would not, particularly with stochastic screening, there is no familiar dot pattern like a halftone dot. This also applies to laser printers which also don't print a measurable dot.
    So how the manufacturer comes up with a resolution rating escapes me but they advertise a dpi just to be comparative with their competition.
    What is certain is that if you were to set the printer to print at high quality, it really is just printing with more passes and therefore more ink. Perhaps the passes of the inkjet head is closer to each other and hence they call this higher resolution.

    As for dpi of images to be printed, you can really get away with very low resolution but the image file may have been subjected to jpeg compression and re-compression (whenever you open a jpeg file and re-save, the compression algorithim affects quality everytime). These files would not necessarily look that good. I have printed images at 72dpi that haven't been re-scaled to something larger than their original size and was surprised that the print was passable. What I usually do with a PDF when opened is to view it at 100% and check the quality along the edges just to see if there are any artifacts or pixelation. If none, it will likey print OK.

  3. #18
    Member Mark83 is on a distinguished road
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    It's very simple!
    The resolution 300 DPI of image is percfect for most job and if you save in tiff image you can save it to much time, it's not change the quality, and all point are colored.
    The resolution 720x720 is the quantity dot x inches over sheet, but how much is big the dot? The accurancy of the printer how much? how much is covered the ink? it's photografich paper? it's normal paper? all printerhead is cleaned?
    These and most other factory change the quality of image.

    However:
    8x5 - 600 DPI
    10x15 - 500 DPI
    15x21 - 400 DPI
    20x30 - 300 DPI
    30x40 - 250 DPI
    50x70 - 220 DPI
    70x100 - 180 DPI

    This is my rule!

  4. #19
    Junior Member luca73 is on a distinguished road
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    Can give us more details about your printer/rip software/inks/media?

    Example, Epson hardware res. is 180dpi or 360dpi (with tfp heads), but the final results can change a lot if you print on photo paper, blueback paper, or other media.
    The quality change if you use different dot pattern in the rip software or different calibration in the plotter's print options.
    Anyway, the resolution is not the only element that change the quality.

  5. #20
    Junior Member gearsandgeardrives is on a distinguished road
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    Linear actuators

    [URL="http://www.gearsandgeardrives.com/bg.php"]Linear actuators are basic building blocks as manufacturing automation equipment. The linear actuator directs a force that it receives from another device into a straight line in order to perform a task. If the actuator is powered by electricity, it will turn that force into a straight line force. That is very straightforward. If the actuator is powered by hydraulics, it will do the same thing with the power, convert it into a straight line. There are different of sources of power for the linear actuator that is used as manufacturing automation equipment. Driving power from pneumatics, electricity, or hydraulics are the sources. The selection of any of these sources is usually dictated by the type of application in which it will be employed, the budget for the application, and the performance required.[/URL]

    for more details
    http://www.gearsandgeardrives.com

  6. #21
    PRC Member lessbones is on a distinguished road
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    Epson resolution is 720 max for ripping, and even then you may need to use a RIP to achieve that precision, I'm not sure the epson driver supports it. The only time I've noticed a real difference is when attempting to simulate a halft screen, with prints that are being looked at through a loupe--

    sending files at anything more than 300dpi (or 360) you basically hit the law of diminishing returns.

  7. #22
    Junior Member 647689321a is on a distinguished road
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    The image is in chanels of greylevels. Can´t be compared with the resolution of the printer because each printhead works in Black or White (i am not crazy, or it shoot ink or not). 300 Dpi is fine but the best is to adpatate Dpi to be multiple of the printer´s resolution (1440 like epson should work with images of 720 or 360 for example).

  8. #23
    Donor T. Schruda is on a distinguished road
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    there is quite a lot of misunderstanding going on about those dpi.
    and it doesnt get better because it is repeated over and over again!

    here people are talking about "hardware" resolution. its the rendering resolution for the printer. i would like to call it "input" resolution.

    thats the "dpi" your picture is in.. its how the printer gets it! thats where the rumors are it needs to be "a factor" of your printers input resolution (180/360 epson, 150/300 canon&hp).

    now here comes the rumor part about it.. what people do with this information!

    they have a picture that is 8x10 inches showing 320dpi.. and want to print this in 8x10 inch... so they use a photoshop algorithm do make it "fit".. downgrade sample the image resolution!! to 8x10 at 300dpi.. now what does ps do? recalculate the image! right.. if you dont do it? what does the printer do? recalculte the image!

    so it depends on your hardware and not a rumor which is better! for me all testings showed that my hp Z3 is better then PS..

    same if you enlarge a pic.. NEVER!! recalculate the actual pixel!! if your camera has 12MP.. THATS it!! there is no more information!! let the printer driver do the scaling up to a size of arouch 120dpi... if you have to go under.. use a SPECIAL program for that not PS!

    now what is said here about the "screening resolution" of the printer is far more difficult then mentid prior!!

    inkjet printers dont have a standard stochastic screening.
    each company has its own "thing" about producing color.
    instead of offset dotscreening they use variable dot sizes for ich each ink - and also light inks. and they overlap dots through double striking.
    the standard colors have larger drops then the light inks as well. thats what you have to look for when building RIP profiles yourselve.

    with the hp printer f.e. you cannot see a dot within the 1200x1200 output screening with the cont driver.. with a RIPs stochastic screening you most likely will see it because f.e. it starts to use hps blue already at 10% coverage. and blue has larger dots then cyan in the set!

    on the other side the RIP can use an input of 1200x1200 dpi! so if you have a highly detailed pic you will clearly see a difference in the output of branches f.e.

    bottom is.. there is input and output resolution. my experience with the superior hp cont driver is not to change the picture's dots! let the printer do the work!

    have fun printing!

  9. #24
    Moderator Aaron125 is on a distinguished road
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    Well, actually all of the 'attempted' explanations of why a printer has such a huge resolution spec, compared to the actual image which is fed into it is as follows (and it's extremely simple and straight-forward to understand):

    For example, a particular Epson printer may have specs of 2880x1440 dpi. Now all this is referring to is 2 very simple and unchanging specifications. The higher number is almost always the resolution of the actual printhead, as in how far apart each ink nozzle is from the next and the lower number is the resolution of the stepper motor in the printer which feeds the paper through. It REALLY IS as simple as that.

    Some may ask why the printer needs such a huge resolution spec if the image being printed is 'only' 300 or 360ppi and that again is very simple to understand: An inkjet printer NEVER prints a single droplet of ink for a single image pixel. More often than not, at least 4-10 printer dots are required to produce imnage pixel, hence the huge discrepancy between image ppi res and printer dpi res.

    It isn't complicated at all, has NOTHING to do with similarities between hifi peak power Watts and RMS Watts or anything like that.

    And just for the record, Jeff Schewe proved well over a year ago that if an image has higher than 360ppi native res, the latest Epson x900 printers will definitely show a visible improvement if they are supplied with images at a res of 480ppi or higher. But it must be native image resolution, not interpolation of up-rezzing of any kind.

  10. #25
    Junior Member jivemofo is on a distinguished road
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    Quote Originally Posted by colormatters View Post
    I've found this on the internet a blog by Gordon Pritchard, it's very useful

    http://the-print-guide.blogspot.com/search/label/LPI%2FDPI
    i've visited his site many times. tons of helpful info there!

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  12. #26
    Junior Member toli13 is on a distinguished road
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron125 View Post
    ...

    And just for the record, Jeff Schewe proved well over a year ago that if an image has higher than 360ppi native res, the latest Epson x900 printers will definitely show a visible improvement if they are supplied with images at a res of 480ppi or higher. But it must be native image resolution, not interpolation of up-rezzing of any kind.
    I go with that. I'm working on a 9900 with huge stitched panoramic photos. A native resolution of 720 dpi gives a little extra of details. But in practice it's not useful. Under a magnifying glass its visible, but usual photos are seen from a distance of 60 cm or more and nobody has eagle eyes to see the difference.

  13. #27
    Junior Member king of deadlift is on a distinguished road
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    they do give off different feelings, it is subtle things like that that can make an image pop. think of grain in film. you can't see it from far but it makes a difference.

    -cd

  14. #28
    Junior Member imag is on a distinguished road
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    I print in a Epson 9900 from 72lpi but with the file at the same size of the print, never had a problem, my rule is the better file resolution, the better the print.

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