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Thread: Inkjet resolution question

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    Junior Member corkymac is on a distinguished road
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    Inkjet resolution question

    Hi all,

    Just a question that has always bothered me.

    The industry standard for an image is 300dpi but if a printer is 1440x720dpi for example, what's the max image resolution it can take?

    I remember running a computer to plate where we do all images at 300dpi yet the ctp said it can do 2400x2400.

    Hmmm

  2. #2
    Banned Topstep1 is on a distinguished road
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    usually, the lower number is the printer's 'true' hardware resolution. 720dpi and 'it' does a trick to up the resolution of one axis; usually thru stepping

    Some believe it's a good practice to just stay on the 'grid' (when possible)

    360dpi max for an image (best quality)
    180dpi (second best quality)

    even when printing at a true hardware resolution of 1440dpi or the sudo 2880


    both are even multiple of the printer's 'true' hardware resolution


    if your lineart is vector it will automatically print at the hardware resolution set. if not you can benefit from it being 720dpi when needed or just use lower res and try to stay on the grid.


    Topstep1

  3. #3
    Junior Member corkymac is on a distinguished road
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    Thanks, is there a real difference in appearance of an image at 360dpi at 720?

    It's always baffled me with the resolution of inkjets so I've always stuck to 300dpi.

    :)

  4. #4
    Donor neon is on a distinguished road
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    yes & no

    Quote Originally Posted by corkymac View Post
    Thanks, is there a real difference in appearance of an image at 360dpi at 720?

    It's always baffled me with the resolution of inkjets so I've always stuck to 300dpi.

    :)
    in theory if you send a 360dpi image to the printer, the driver doesn't have to do any rescaling. in practice the posible artefacts, in 99% of cases are not visible, so it's a "just to be safe" rule. Epson had, a long ago, a guide for professional large format printers in which the rule was to send 180dpi to over 13" models & 360dpi for smaller printers, matching the internal hardware resolution.

  5. #5
    Donor neon is on a distinguished road
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    Quote Originally Posted by Topstep1 View Post
    usually, the lower number is the printer's 'true' hardware resolution. 720dpi and 'it' does a trick to up the resolution of one axis; usually thru stepping

    Some believe it's a good practice to just stay on the 'grid' (when possible)

    360dpi max for an image (best quality)
    180dpi (second best quality)

    even when printing at a true hardware resolution of 1440dpi or the sudo 2880


    both are even multiple of the printer's 'true' hardware resolution


    if your lineart is vector it will automatically print at the hardware resolution set. if not you can benefit from it being 720dpi when needed or just use lower res and try to stay on the grid.


    Topstep1
    over 360dpi is overkill. the max hardware internal res is 360 & only under 13" wide printers. 720-2880 are resolutions obtained by varying the dropplets size for a smoother appearance, not real hardware resolution.

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    Junior Member corkymac is on a distinguished road
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    Where do you find the hardware resolution? Reminds me of watts and rms watts lol

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    Banned Topstep1 is on a distinguished road
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    Quote Originally Posted by corkymac View Post
    Thanks, is there a real difference in appearance of an image at 360dpi at 720?

    It's always baffled me with the resolution of inkjets so I've always stuck to 300dpi.

    :)

    The whole 300dpi comes form when film was mostly used for offset printing and the screening was classic AM screening. The rule was that content creators (designers) would have the best results if their Scanning/Image resolution was twice the line screen of the LPI used for printing. So that if someone was printing with 150lpi, which was typical; than they would make there scans at twice this lpi, which was 300dpi. (then later everyone started saying 1.5 times the line screen.

    but not to get off track; the 300dpi comes from it being twice the line screen (lpi) of 150.

    150lpi on press
    300dpi for images/scans


    Topstep1

  8. #8
    Donor neon is on a distinguished road
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    Quote Originally Posted by corkymac View Post
    Where do you find the hardware resolution? Reminds me of watts and rms watts lol
    :)) yeah, it is the same. You can't find this spec simply because the printer manufacturers wants us to believe, that a large format production printer, which spits meters per hour has huge resolution. Nonsense. Any printer with seiko heads, epson included of course, has 180 or 360 real resolution. I can vouch for that because i worked many years in an production agency & we had there pretty much any type of printer. Hp, canon, stops at 300 max.

  9. #9
    Junior Member Ray Vega is on a distinguished road
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    360 File, then depends on paper

    An Epson engineer told me feed a 360DPI file resolution and no more for the best results. After that, some papers will render a better image than 1440 (we're talking Epson printers here) if output at 2880 for printing resolution settings, depends on dot gain.

  10. #10
    Donor colormatters is on a distinguished road
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    I've found this on the internet a blog by Gordon Pritchard, it's very useful

    http://the-print-guide.blogspot.com/search/label/LPI%2FDPI

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  12. #11
    Junior Member pankrakonos is on a distinguished road
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    The hardware resolution it means the smallest single point of color. The second thing is screening. This is how to make the color gradients by using the hw resolution. Offset screening is called AM rastering and uses a halftone screens. InkJet screening is called FM rastering and uses the single points. The mathematicaly method is different, so are different the resolution needed for rastering. The offset AM rastering needs typicaly 300–360 ppi, the inkjet FM needs min. 150 ppi, max. about 200–250 ppi for photoprinters.

  13. #12
    Junior Member Marco Antonio is on a distinguished road
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    360dpi max for an image (best quality)
    180dpi (second best quality)

  14. #13
    Donor Panos is on a distinguished road
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    The real LPI number is anyway much smaller than these numbers specially in large format machines. So giving these resolutions for printing will be more than enough.

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    Junior Member printrooot is on a distinguished road
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    Use printer real res,ex. Epson printer is 720dpi

  16. #15
    Member Ale_Paris is on a distinguished road
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    I have always printed at 300 dpi on desktop inkjet printers but sometimes I've been asked to sed the dpi down to 218 or 200 for some lambda printers (thing that, to me, sounds very strange).

    Anyway thank you for the explanations, it's been really useful!

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