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Thread: To Extend color gamut

  1. #1
    Banned maeiwill is on a distinguished road
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    To Extend color gamut

    hi everybody if you can plz help me to know how to extend color gamut for my digital hp printer and how to simulate printing press color gamut on my screen and to avoid out of gamut color and thanks for help

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    Junior Member vmannello is on a distinguished road
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    Extending your gamut isnt really possible, unless your machine is not currently profiled by an accurate tool. First build accurate profiles for your printer and monitor and see if that helps, otherwise look for purchasing a printer that offers gamut extensions in the areas you want. For example if your photos are looking muddy in the shadows you might want to think about a printer that has multiple blacks which greatly increase depth in shadows. CMYKcm printers will extend the gamut greatly, CMYKRGB is an option as well. All depends on what you are looking for!

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    Member PanozJani is on a distinguished road
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    hello,
    You could try to use a different (higher grade = more expensive) proofing paper and/or higher resolution / more passes (sometimes disguised as a quality setting). with more ink on a brighter paper You could increase the gamut.

    It is hard to give recommendation with so minimal information (printer/paper/Rip type, what is Your exact workflow, what are You trying to simulate, etc..

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    Junior Member rhguru is on a distinguished road
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    you can try higher resolutions and more passes but also you might doublecheck your profile. because gamut is 3D space and the max cmyk peaks create its shape it good to not make to much dark, because it doesn't increase it at all. if your linearization tool provides lab values for cmyk peaks try to make them as close to press standard values as possible and mostly lool for L value:
    cyan L54
    magenta L47 (but i suggest 50)
    yellow L89
    black less than L16 (if you cant go any further just leave it at max)
    also try to rich the black with more cmy in profile building, this might help you get it blacker.
    for screen press matching there several applications but photoshop makes it fine as well. just make good screen icc profile and set it up as working rgb in photoshop. then set up working cmyk with press standard that matches your region (eg. fogra39 in EU)

  6. #5
    Banned maeiwill is on a distinguished road
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    Quote Originally Posted by PanozJani View Post
    hello,
    You could try to use a different (higher grade = more expensive) proofing paper and/or higher resolution / more passes (sometimes disguised as a quality setting). with more ink on a brighter paper You could increase the gamut.

    It is hard to give recommendation with so minimal information (printer/paper/Rip type, what is Your exact workflow, what are You trying to simulate, etc..
    thank its away i never think to extend gamut

  7. #6
    Banned maeiwill is on a distinguished road
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    Quote Originally Posted by rhguru View Post
    you can try higher resolutions and more passes but also you might doublecheck your profile. because gamut is 3D space and the max cmyk peaks create its shape it good to not make to much dark, because it doesn't increase it at all. if your linearization tool provides lab values for cmyk peaks try to make them as close to press standard values as possible and mostly lool for L value:
    cyan L54
    magenta L47 (but i suggest 50)
    yellow L89
    black less than L16 (if you cant go any further just leave it at max)
    also try to rich the black with more cmy in profile building, this might help you get it blacker.
    for screen press matching there several applications but photoshop makes it fine as well. just make good screen icc profile and set it up as working rgb in photoshop. then set up working cmyk with press standard that matches your region (eg. fogra39 in EU)
    Thanks
    im working with colormuchRGb its more close with CMYK and ill like to work with american standard SWOP i thing To its Better

  8. #7
    PRC Member lessbones is on a distinguished road
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    i'm assuming you meant colorMATCHrgb, for which it is not really true that it is closer with SWOP. colormatch was made to be a working profile for specific CRT monitors from way back in the day, and it is basically the same size gamut as sRGB just shifted over a little bit. Obviously if you are trying to extend your gamut, you need to get away from using colormatch. AdobeRGB is a much wider color space, and when proofing to CMYK you should be converting to CMYK anyway, so you can set up some kind of soft-proofing in photoshop to deal with out of gamut colors for your proofing space. Colormatch is your limiting factor here.

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    Banned maeiwill is on a distinguished road
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    Quote Originally Posted by lessbones View Post
    i'm assuming you meant colorMATCHrgb, for which it is not really true that it is closer with SWOP. colormatch was made to be a working profile for specific CRT monitors from way back in the day, and it is basically the same size gamut as sRGB just shifted over a little bit. Obviously if you are trying to extend your gamut, you need to get away from using colormatch. AdobeRGB is a much wider color space, and when proofing to CMYK you should be converting to CMYK anyway, so you can set up some kind of soft-proofing in photoshop to deal with out of gamut colors for your proofing space. Colormatch is your limiting factor here.
    thank i know

  10. #9
    Banned maeiwill is on a distinguished road
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    Quote Originally Posted by lessbones View Post
    i'm assuming you meant colorMATCHrgb, for which it is not really true that it is closer with SWOP. colormatch was made to be a working profile for specific CRT monitors from way back in the day, and it is basically the same size gamut as sRGB just shifted over a little bit. Obviously if you are trying to extend your gamut, you need to get away from using colormatch. AdobeRGB is a much wider color space, and when proofing to CMYK you should be converting to CMYK anyway, so you can set up some kind of soft-proofing in photoshop to deal with out of gamut colors for your proofing space. Colormatch is your limiting factor here.
    thank for info you know a test to see that from rgb to rgb

  11. #10
    Junior Member Ray Vega is on a distinguished road
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    2 Methods come to mind right off

    but, they're not expanding the spectrals of the inks which would be a genuine way to increase gamut. So, you could push your blacks out, causing the perceived image to be more colorful (under certain circumstances only). The other method is whiter paper (more optical brighteners). You could try altering screening methods for slight shifts in gamut boundaries, as spectrophotometers can respond differently to differing screening conditions slightly mis-reporting actual gamut, depending on a variety of variables with the media and paper white between dots. But, a different ink set is always an option, but cleaner spectrals usually compromise elsewhere, such as permanence, although I don't know if that's an issue. Finally, try lighting with a higher correlated color temperature bulb - more blue will fire up images, unless you're sending work out and can't control for this.

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